Charcuterie RSS

Charcuterie, Pro Spotlight -

What's Pua'a? And Why is it Hawaii's Best Meat? Kauai-native, avid bow hunter, spare fisherman, rancher and adventurous cook, David Takiguchi (Instagram handle: davidspearo) dedicates an entire fridge to his pua'a harvest. He has brought the ancient tradition of hunting pua'a into the modern day with a little UMAi Dry inspiration.  So, what's pua'a? In Hawai'i, pua'a (wild pig) has been eaten for millennia. Existing in isolation, the Hawaiian islands, originally possessed very few edible land animals and plants. Between 300 and 500 AD, the first settlers arrived from elsewhere in Polynesia, bringing with them plants to cultivate and animals (pigs, chickens, and dogs, to name a...

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Charcuterie, Newsletter, Pro-tips, Salumi -

To make charcuterie or salumi at home, basically, all that is required is meat, salt, and patience--and UMAi Dry! Of course, you need the correct proportion of salt to meat. To achieve this, you must choose the right salt and measure it by weight.

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Charcuterie, Newsletter, Salumi -

A charcuterie board crafted with your very own Bresaola, Lonzino, and Capicola using UMAi Dry Charcuterie Spice Blends.

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Charcuterie, Newsletter, Pro-tips, Salumi, Steak, Vacuum Sealer -

With UMAi Dry, anyone anywhere can craft genuine dry aged steak in a typical kitchen refrigerator. Sometimes basic misunderstandings stand in the way of easy, successful dry aging. Understanding the processes behind UMAi Dry will help you eliminate potential waste and get to a delicious steak dinner faster. Read over this list of myths and facts to help simplify the process Myth 1: The bags will look, feel, and act like a vacuum sealer bag. Since you can apply UMAi Dry with a vacuum sealer, first-time customers often expect that UMAi Dry bags should perform like a typical vacuum preservation bag, like those made by FoodSaver®.  In fact, the...

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Charcuterie, Pro-tips, Salumi -

ASK MAUREEN  “J” Asks: How Much Salt Do I Need? “In the recipe archive for capicola, the recipe asks for 6 tbsps of salt for 4 1/2 pounds of meat, but on the video the lady only uses 3 tbsps. of salt for 4 1/2 pounds of meat.  Could you please verify which of the recipes is correct?” Good catch, "J"!  A bit more salt is safer than a bit too little, but 3% salt to weight of meat is critical for safety and for flavor.  Here’s the thing, typical American volume measurements are terrible for measuring salt accurately. When you simply measure...

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